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Free Webinar: Towards A medically Actionable Whole Genome Sequence

Please join us on June 20, 2012 from 10am-11am PT for "Towards A Medically Actionable Whole Genome Sequence" a free webinar with:

  • Grant Campany - Senior Director, Archon Genomics X Prize presented by Express Scripts
  • Justin H. Johnson - PhD Director of Bioionformatics, EdgeBio
  • Marc Salit - PhD Group Leader, Biochemical Science Multiplexed Bimolecular Science, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
  • Moderated by Kevin Davies - PhD editor in chief of Bio-IT World

The Archon Genomics X PRIZE presented by Express Scripts created a "Validation Protocol" that is helping to define for the first time what it means to have a complete and accurate medically actionable whole human genome sequence. This webinar will describe the Validation Protocol in detail, as well as present preliminary data on the methodologies employed to reconstruct the fosmid data, compare sequencing technologies to minimize bias, and develop software for whole genome comparison to fosmid data for contestant grading.

You can download this webinar here http://bit.ly/L6wwbH or view it on our Webinars page.

About the Archon Genomics X PRIZE presented by Express Scripts:

The Archon Genomics X PRIZE presented by Express Scripts will award $10 million to the first team to sequence 100 human genomes in 30 days or less at a maximum cost of $1,000 (USD) per genome sequence, attaining an accuracy score of no more than one error per 1,000,000 bases, present each genome as 98% complete and provide accurate haplotype phasing.

The 100 human genome samples to be sequenced in this competition will provide the research community with an unprecedented opportunity to analyze what will likely be the most deeply sequenced set of human genomes ever assembled.  In addition, the redundant sequencing of the same set of genomes by multiple teams, using different technology platforms, will likely allow subsequent rapid corrections, generating a nearly error-free set of 100 human genomes.